the patient celiac

Celiac Disease Research Awareness

0 comments May 07, 2015

I've come across many recent headlines stating that scientists are working toward finding a “cure” for celiac disease, including this recent article.  In actuality, the bulk of the current celiac disease drug studies are focusing on treatments to be used in addition to the gluten-free diet to protect those of us with celiac from damage from gluten cross-contamination. I wrote about some potential future celiac disese treatments in my post from last October.

I was curious to learn about other current celiac disease studies, so I searched the website clinicaltrials.gov using the search terms “celiac disease” and “gluten” earlier today.  I found that there are over 150 studies of celiac disease and gluten sensitivity worldwide and that many of them are currently recruiting subjects. One of the current studies that I found to be the most interesting is the Celiac Disease Genomic Microbiome and Metabolomic (CDGEMM) Study at Massachusetts General Hospital, led by Dr. Alessio Fasano. The CDGEMM study is investigating the role of the microbiome, and other factors, in the development of celiac disease in genetically-predisposed babies.

Topics of other gluten-related studies that are currently recruiting subjects include the following:

-Non-invasive markers of gluten ingestion in celiac disease patients

-Neurocognitive effects of gluten exposure in patients with celiac disease and non-celiac gluten  sensitivity

-Use of the gluten free diet in schizophrenic patients with elevated anti-gliadin antibodies

-Probiotics to treat IBS symptoms in patients with celiac disease

-Non-celiac wheat sensitivity (mulitple studies including biomarkers to be used for testing)

-Gluten free diet for patients with autistic spectrum disorders

In addition, I recently learned that Stanford University is recruiting families with at least one parent and child with celiac disease for a research study on the genetics of celiac. Subjects can live anywhere in the U.S., the testing consists of a simple blood draw, and the "child" in the study can be an adult. Please see this link for more details.

For more information on celiac disease research and studies, please check out the National Foundation for Celiac Awareness and the University of Chicago Center for Celiac Disease websites. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) Celiac Disease Awareness Campaign website also has great information about celiac disease research and clinical trials as well.

Have any of you had the opportunity to participate in any celiac disease studies? If so, I would love to hear about your experiences. I was interested in participating in the recent Celiaction Study but was unable to because I lived too far from any of the research centers.

Thank you and Happy Celiac Awareness Month to all of you!

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