the patient celiac

Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and Celiac Disease

0 comments May 12, 2013

I recently did an online continuing medical education activity on Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS).&nbsp; This is a diagnosis which I never see in my patient population, so I found it interesting to learn about.<br/>

 

According to the presentation, CFS is severe fatigue that persists for at least six months and results in a significant decrease in activity. The fatigue occurs in combination with at least <b>4</b> of the following symptoms on a regular basis: joint pain, impaired memory and/or concentration, enlarged lymph nodes in the neck, unrefreshing sleep, sore throat, muscle pains, and headaches. &nbsp;CFS is a diagnosis of exclusion, which means that other causes of symptoms need to be ruled out, such as an underactive thyroid gland, before a diagnosis can be made.<br/>


 

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So you just found out that you have Celiac Disease….now what?

0 comments May 03, 2013

1. Cry. Be angry. Complain. Mourn the loss of gluten from your life. You will never be able to eat pasta, pizza, chocolate chip cookies, or drink beer again. Feel sorry for yourself. Cry and yell some more. Get it all out, emotionally, at the beginning. FYI, I was so angry and in denial at first that I ate a whole sleeve of Thin Mint Girl Scout cookies and then cheesy pizza bread sticks within a 24 hour period right after my testing was complete…the effects on my body were so horrible, that I was able to then go gluten free and never look back (I just wish that I been smarter about choosing my last gluten-containing foods).

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Celiac Disease and the Thyroid Gland

0 comments April 24, 2013

If you have Celiac Disease, it is important that you know a bit about your thyroid gland, as you are at a high risk of autoimmune thyroid disease. Experts estimate that between 8 and 12% of people with Celiac Disease have, or will eventually develop, problems with their thyroid gland. Conversely, between 3 and 5% of people with autoimmune thyroid disease will develop Celiac Disease. I was diagnosed with Hashimoto’s Disease (hypothyroidism) in 2003, seven years before my Celiac diagnosis. The thyroid gland is a butterfly-shaped gland that is present in the neck region, just under the region of the "Adam’s apple," which is made up of two lobes (see diagram).

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My, Oh My, Peripheral Neuropathy

0 comments September 12, 2013

I spent a good chunk of last Christmas Eve in an MRI scanner, getting my spine analyzed for the white matter lesions of multiple sclerosis (MS). Mike, the MRI technician, piped George Winston’s “December” CD through my MRI headphones, but the music did little to drown out the loud hammering sounds of the MRI and the thoughts that were racing in my head. I prayed and bargained while I was in the scanner, with thoughts such as, “If I do have MS, please let it be relapsing-remitting and not primary progressive,” and, “If I am going to become disabled from MS, please let it happen after my 4 babies have been raised and are out of the house.”

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Celiac Disease "Journal Club" 2013 Part 1

0 comments September 04, 2013

As some of you may have figured out, I love to keep up to date with the latest research regarding celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS). My interest in research stems from the countless Journal Clubs that I participated in during my decade of medical training. Journal Club gives medical students, residents, fellows, and other trainees the opportunity to learn how to read, interpret, and critically review research articles. Although there are many things which I do not miss about medical training (especially the sleep deprivation), I do miss Journal Club.

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Update on Celiac Disease Screening in Infants and Toddlers

0 comments April 18, 2013

There are multiple reasons why a young child may need to be evaluated for Celiac Disease. The most obvious reason is if he or she has symptoms, such as chronic diarrhea, poor growth, and/or anemia. Other reasons include having a first degree relative (parent or sibling) who has Celiac Disease or having another autoimmune disorder, such as Type 1 diabetes. The main blood tests to screen for Celiac Disease are tissue transglutaminase IgA (TTG IgA) antibodies and endomysial IgA (EMA IgA) antibodies. These tests are highly sensitive, which means that if the tests are negative, Celiac Disease can be ruled out most of the time. The problem with using these tests in infants and toddlers is that the sensitivity of these tests is much lower for children under the age of 2 than it is for older children and adults. Some believe that this is because young children with Celiac Disease have not had enough time to develop TTG and EMA IgA antibodies which can be measured. Needless to say, there are probably many toddlers with Celiac Disease who are walking around undiagnosed because they did not have elevated TTG and/or EMA IgA antibodies when they were tested.

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A New Food "Allergy" of Infancy: Food Protein Induced Enterocolitis Syndrome (FPIES)

0 comments April 10, 2013

My oldest daughter, Grace, had horribly bad reactions to cow's milk protein as an infant, which included vomiting, chronic diarrhea with mucus, irritability, reflux, and poor growth. Her first reaction occurred shortly after getting her initial supplemental bottle of formula. She was predominantly breastfed at first, but I did have to supplement her due to milk supply issues (which, looking back, I believe were a result of my undiagnosed Celiac Disease). She went through a series of formula changes (from regular to soy to Alimentum and Nutramigen), and it was not until she was started on Neocate, an amino acid based formula, at 2 months, that she began to grow and thrive. Looking back, I am pretty sure that she had food protein induced enterocolitis syndrome, which is also called FPIES.

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Socializing and Socca Bread

0 comments April 08, 2013

I was recently reminded of how socially isolating Celiac Disease can be.  I attended a day long volunteering orientation during which a complimentary lunch of sub sandwiches and cookies was provided for attendees. I was not surprised by this, and, as usual, packed and brought a lunch from home. I am so far into this whole Celiac thing that I was not bothered by this at all.  The two women sitting closest to me at the orientation were curious as to why I brought own lunch when we knew ahead of time that a free lunch was going to be provided. I went through the whole, "I have Celiac Disease, so I get very sick if I eat gluten," explanation for the umpteenth time. Again, not a big deal, and I am always happy to educate others about gluten-related illnesses.

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It is Possible to Have Both Celiac Disease and I.B.S.

0 comments April 01, 2013

Like many, I had a long delay in my diagnosis of Celiac Disease and walked around for years with a label of Irritable Bowel Syndrome (I.B.S.) Once I was diagnosed with Celiac Disease in 2010, I threw my diagnosis of I.B.S. in the garbage. From a medical standpoint, I have ignored discussions and articles regarding I.B.S., digestive problems in fibromyalgia, “functional bowel disease,” FODMAPs, etc. because I have assumed that they do not apply to me. Also, the largest patients I take care of are about 12 lbs., and, fortunately, do not suffer from I.B.S.

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Sun Dogs, Celiac, and Gratitude

0 comments March 26, 2013

The sun was setting as I was driving to meet a friend for dinner last night, and I noticed that there was what looked like a multi-colored beam of light going almost all the way around the sun. I was so enthralled with staring at it that I missed my exit twice! When I got home I searched the internet and found that the phenomenon, called a parhelion (plural is parhelia), is due to atmospheric ice crystals which act like giant prisms. When the beams are not totally connected, they are called “sun dogs.” My friend and I shared a fabulous meal and as I drove home I reflected on how grateful I am for my family, friends, faith, health, and the foods and beverages that I can (and do) eat and drink.

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